Tibetans Community celebrate Tibetan Lunar new Year.

Tibetans coummnity residing in different countries of  Asia celebrated the first day of the Tibetan lunar new year, Losar, on Monday. Special prayers.

The festival is celebrated mostly by Sherpa, Tamang, Bhutia and Yolmo communities in the country, while different communities and different places have their own celebrations.

Gyalpo Losar is a celebration of the Tibetan New Year and this is the Year of the Bird. The Tibetan calendar is made up of twelve lunar months andLosar begins on the first day of the first month. Losar celebrations begin on the 29th day of the 12th month of the calendar

Gyalpo Losar is celebrated for 15 days, with the main celebrations on the first three days. On the first day, a beverage called changkol is made fromchhaang (a Tibetan beer). The second day is known as King’s Losar(Gyalpo Losar) while on the third day people get together and have feasts with traditional music and dancing.

People drink a toast with each other to greet the Tibetan New Year, or Losar, at 
a community in Lhasa, capital of southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, 
Feb. 27, 2017. (Xinhua/Jigme Dorje)

A teacher serves dumplings for children to greet the Tibetan New Year, or Losar, 
at a children welfare institute in Lhasa, capital of southwest China's Tibet
 Autonomous Region, Feb. 27, 2017. (Xinhua/Liu Dongjun)

People dance to greet the Tibetan New Year, or Losar, at a community in Chengguan
 District in Lhasa, capital of southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, 
Feb. 27, 2017. (Xinhua/Chogo)

Local people propose a toast to greet the Tibetan New Year, or Losar, at a 
community in Chengguan District in Lhasa, capital of southwest China's 
Tibet Autonomous Region, Feb. 27, 2017. (Xinhua/Chogo)

Special prayers were held in the morning at Tsuglagkhang temple, close to the official palace of the Dalai Lama at McLeodganj. Monday was the first day of the Tibetan lunar new year 2144.

 Speaking on the occasion, Tibetan Prime Minister-in-exile Lobsang Sangay expressed concern over the plight of people of Tibet. “Those of us who are in exile should be aware of it and summon courage and determination to carry forward the Tibetan freedom movement, based on truth, justice and non-violence,” said Sangay.

The number of Tibetans coming to India has declined. Official sources here said that about 212 new Tibetan refugees were registered here last year, including 113 who came on special entry permit through Nepal border.

He said the situation inside Tibet continued to remain grim under repression and oppression. “Those of us who are in exile should be aware of it and summon courage and determination to carry forward the Tibetan freedom movement, based on truth, justice and non-violence.”Extending greetings, the 17th Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje, who is the third most important Tibetan religious head, said in a message: “May the year of the Fire Bird brings you good health, peace and joy and all your aspirations be fulfilled.”

The Dalai Lama and his followers fled Tibet after a failed uprising against China’s communist rule in 1959.

Around 140,000 Tibetans now live in exile, over 100,000 of them in different parts of India.

Over six million Tibetans live in Tibet.

Giving his best wishes on the occasion, Prime Minister of Nepal Puspa Kamal Dahal said there must be unity amid diversity among the nation’s citizens. Speaking at a programme organised to mark the festival in Kathmandu today, the prime minister said Nepali people have always lived in harmony and tolerance despite the vast range of castes, cultures, festivals, rituals and social communities.

Tibetans In Exile Celebrate New Year, Hold Special Prayers

The Dalai Lama fled Tibet after a failed uprising against China’s communist rule in 1959.

 

 

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